Find Mediators Near You:

1000 Out Of A 1000 People Love This Concept

From the Mediation Matters Blog of Steve Mehta.

Which one convinces you more? If I told you that 90% of the time people lose their medical malpractice actions or that 9 out of 10 people lose their medical malpractice actions.

Many of you are saying, there is a no difference. 90% and 9/10 are the same thing. This is where you are wrong 90% of the time.

The human brain is hardwired to make short circuit decisions all the time. There is automatic programming that occurs in making decisions. Otherwise, we would be mired in making decisions.

A new study has discovered that people would prefer large numbers over smaller numbers. The study found that people prefer to receive shipped items in 31 days rather than the same period of one month. In fact, the subjects were willing to pay more money to receive something in 31 days instead of a month.

In one of the tests, the researchers used two different scales, either 1-10 or 1-1,000, to describe television quality and the success rate of a medical procedure; they also fed the subjects warranty lengths in either months or years. Even when the length of time was the same—seven versus nine years, or 94 versus 108 months—the subjects tended to prefer the bigger number. The same thing happened for medical procedures, where an equivalent effectiveness was preferred when it was rated on a thousand-point scale. (QUOTED FROM The “unit effect” makes 31 days seem better than a month).

This concept is also known as the Unit Effect Bias. In other words, people prefer higher numbers rather than lower numbers even though the actual unit is still the same. For example, 1 liter versus 1000 milliliters; 1 month versus 30 days; quarter of a million versus 250,000.

This concept is something that attorneys and mediators should consider when discussing settlement options. Perhaps the settlement terms of payment; maybe the amount of the settlement — 100,000 versus 6 figures; or 2 weeks versus 14 days.

The reality is that in negotiations it is important to understand that our brain may work in many irrational ways.

                        author

Steve Mehta

Steven G. Mehta is an attorney and mediator providing unique mediation services in a variety of types of civil litigation. His ability to understand the human process and complex emotional issues involved in legal negotiations enables him to effectively assist the parties in obtaining the best possible results during mediation.… MORE >

Featured Members

ad
View all

Read these next

Category

You Could be One of the 7%: Get the Most Out of Every Deal

Someone recently told me that you can’t argue with a story, only with a position or another argument. That’s why narrative is such a powerful negotiation strategy and why asking...

By Victoria Pynchon
Category

Mediating Pain And Suffering Is All About Balance

First published by The Daily Journal on July 30, 2010. Republished with permission. For a while it always intrigued me how when mediating employment and personal injury cases, attorneys and...

By Milan Slama
Category

Processing it All on the Last Day….

On my last evening in Israel, I walked on the beach and gazed at the sunset over the beautiful Mediteranean Sea and I was full of so many complex thoughts....

By Karmit Bulman
×