Find Mediators Near You:

Five Key Items to Understand About Mediation

Five Key Items to Understand About Mediation

Parties involved in litigation should always keep an open mind about mediation at every stage of litigation.  Cases that resolve without having to go through a trial or arbitration can potentially save the parties a lot of time and money in litigation.  This article touches on five items parties need to understand about mediation.

1. Mediation is non-binding.
Mediation is a voluntary process in which litigants (or even parties prior to litigation) agree to use a private third-party to help settle the case. People sometimes confuse mediation with arbitration. Arbitration is when parties agree to use a private third-party to hear their case, much like a judge, to make decisions about the case, and eventually decide the case. Arbitration can be binding on the parties, and the arbitrator actually decides who is right and wrong as a matter of law. On the other hand, a mediator is not deciding any issues about the case, but is simply hearing both sides’ positions, and then works with the parties to see if there is a potential resolution that the parties would both agree to. The mediator has no ability to decide issues of the case, or make any binding rulings about the case. The mediator is only an unbiased third-party attempting to get the parties to consider a possible resolution to the case.

2. Mediation takes place with a private mediator, usually not the court.
The parties voluntarily agree upon the selection of a mediator. Usually the mediator has expertise in the area of the law that the case involves so that he or she can move quicker into the substance of the parties’ disagreement. There are many retired judges or lawyers that work as mediators. Some mediators are active practicing lawyers that also have a mediation service established.
The mediation usually takes place at the mediator’s office. Normally the mediator has the parties in separate rooms, and the mediator walks between the two rooms. There are many mediations during which the parties will not see other side the entire day.

3. Negotiations during the mediation are privileged and cannot be used against either party during litigation.
California law prevents any of the negotiations or potential admissions made during mediation from being brought up in court or during litigation. The rationale for this rule is that the courts want people to be able to negotiate during mediation, this involves some give and take. Therefore, in order to assist the mediation process, any of the discussions or negotiations during mediation are prevented from being used against the other party. This allows parties to discuss items more freely during mediation in hopes of having a better chance at resolving the case. However, it should be noted that if a party makes an admission during mediation, the other party can still conduct discovery after the mediation and bring that admission into the case through the standard discovery process. So parties should follow their counsel’s advice about which facts to share during the mediation process. But rest assured, the fact that one party agreed to offer a certain amount to settle the case during mediation, this offer to settle cannot be brought up to the jury later in the case as a way to establish liability.

4. The mediator’s only role is to get the case settled.
The mediator is not there to make friends, tell you if she believes you more than the other side, or make a value judgment about the case or people involved. His or her role is simply to get the case resolved. This usually means that a successful mediator is able to have each party questioning the strength of their case. A successful mediation usually means that both sides are unhappy with the resolution.

Read the complete article here.

Featured Members

ad
View all

Read these next

Category

A Coach Approach For Conflict Management Training

There are many interesting challenges that organizations encounter when considering training in the area of conflict management. Not considered a core competency of many organizations, effective conflict management is still...

By Cinnie Noble
Category

The Poetic Unfolding of the Human Spirit

This essay by John Paul Lederach was originally published by the Fetzer Institute. Permission to repost this booklet at Mediate.com has been generously granted. Free printed copies of this booklet...

By John Paul Lederach
Category

Open Source Negotiation Of Public Works

You might recall an earlier post in which I reported the (both expected and astonishing) results of an open source project in which researchers "opened up a set of 166...

By Victoria Pynchon
×