Find Mediators Near You:

Rwanda: Supreme Court certifies nearly 100 graduates in mediation practice

Rwanda: Supreme Court certifies nearly 100 graduates in mediation practice

The Rwanda Supreme Court, on Wednesday, July 6, certified 96 graduates who successfully completed a 6-month course in professional mediation.

Locally known as Abahuza, the role of mediators is to foster alternative dispute resolution through facilitating voluntary settlement of a case out of court.

To be Umuhuza (or a professional mediator), you must possess a bachelors’ degree in any field.

In total, Rwanda has 165 professional mediators to date who secured Chief Justice’s approval to start practising.

Some 250 others have also attended the mandatory 6-month course in mediation but they’ve yet to receive the green light from the Chief Justice authorising them to practise, or have not sought it.

Apart from cases that are criminal in nature, Abahuza can facilitate resolution of any case regardless of the amount involved.

This is contrary to Abunzi (community-based conciliators) that cannot adjudicate cases whose value exceed Frw3 million. There are a total of 17, 941 Abunzi countrywide.

Read the complete article here.

Featured Members

ad
View all

Read these next

Category

We Each Have Something Different to Offer

Mediation Blog by Diane CohenIt is no secret that there are many different approaches to mediation. In the world of mediators, we often classify them as facilitative, evaluative and transformative....

By Diane Cohen
Category

Mediation As Problem-Solving

From Larry Susskind's blog on the Consensus Building Approach The Organizational for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is trying to hold multinational corporations to appropriately high standards of corporate social...

By Larry Susskind
Category

Listening: The Most Under-Utilized Skill In Negotiation

From the blog of Nancy HudginsAs a mediator, I rank listening as the most under-used skill in the negotiations that play out in front of me. If lawyers had training...

By Nancy Hudgins
×