Find Mediators Near You:

Golden Nuggets

I decided to post some of the quick but important tips under the title ‘golden nuggets’. Why, firstly because it’s my blog and I do what i want! Secondly, and a bit more seriously, that is what I feel they are; short postings containing valuable information.

Today’s edition is if you pressed for time to give out your most valuable tips on communication, what would it be?

Tip one: I would say listen to what others are saying, don’t just ‘hear them’. Listening to them gives you valuable information and when you want more, ask an open ended question. Listen more than you speak.

Tip two would be when you do speak, chose your words and how you say them very carefully.

Tip three would be do not let emotions get the best of you. Stay calm, be the peace you want to see in others! Letting emotions get the best of you prevents you from fully being present to listen effectively and even worse, you will most say things you did not want to say.

What would you say?

The Ombuds Office at the University of Hawaii (talk about a dream job!) gives out these three tips (from here):

What you say and how you say it
*Use neutral language. Describe what you saw or heard. What sights and sounds would a video cam have recorded? “Edit out” any judgment, criticism or interpretation of what was seen or heard. * Own the message. I feel, I wish, I hope, I would like to ask. Let the conversation be about your needs or values, not what is (perceived to be) wrong with the other person, or what that person did or did not do.

What you hear and how you hear it
*Try to empathize with what the other person is feeling. By offering empathy you are simply creating a connection with the person – not stating that you agree with what was done or said.
*Acknowledge and make sure you understand the information being given to you. It’s often helpful to repeat what you heard to make sure you got it right.

What you do with the information
*Seek to understand the interests (needs, values, wants) of the other person. Ask for help in understanding why they are important to him or her.
*Search for common ground and a better future. Focus on what is desirable and possible now – you can’t negotiate the past.

Check out their great site [here]

                        author

Jeff Thompson

Jeff Thompson, Ph.D., is a professor at Lipscomb University, researcher, mediator, and trainer. He is also involved in crisis and hostage negotiation as well as a law enforcement detective. His research includes law enforcement crisis and hostage negotiation in terrorist incidents. He received his doctorate from Griffith University Law School… MORE >

Featured Members

ad
View all

Read these next

Category

A Modest Proposal to Mitigate Sexual Harassment and Misconduct in the Workplace

January 15, 2018 edition of the Legal Intelligencer© 2018 ALM Media Properties, LLC. All rights reserved. Further duplication without permission is prohibited, contact 877-257-3382 or [email protected] and news media bombard...

By Stephanie Klein
Category

Mediating At Small Claims Court Also Builds Skills

From the Small Claims Courts blog of Leo Hura. Many of us will love it when we mediate multimillion dollar high profile mediation cases. To get there we need to...

By Leo Hura
Category

Building a Golden Bridge and Other Lessons from Dr. William Ury

The hills above Edinburgh, Scotland were bursting in the monochromatic splendor of bright yellow flowers, announcing the arrival of spring. In their shadow sat the Scottish Parliament building, where we...

By Bruce Edwards
×